There are many ways to measure your current lifestyle. A short list would not be enough, so here is a continuation for you. Take this self-assessment to determine the state of your health. Go over your responses with your doctor to pinpoint areas where improvement are necessary …

1. Do you set caloric limits? Do you set caloric limits on yourself? If you are trying to lose weight, it may be essential, particularly if you are new to weight loss. It is hard to know how much you are eating if you are not entirely familiar with your caloric requirements and the calories you consume.

Counting calories is not necessary for weight loss but it is beneficial.

2. Do you have an eating schedule? Similar to caloric limits, having an eating plan is not necessary per se. But if you need help getting on track, implementing a diet plan can be helpful.

Barring a few exceptions, two daily meals work for everyone. Decide on two different times to eat, and eat only then. Perhaps it will be lunch and dinner at 7, with no snacks in between. You should not need to eat anything in between.

3. What Is Your attitude towards exercise? Your attitude towards exercise speaks volumes. It is even more important than the exercise you do because it dictates how much effort you put in.

Do you view exercise as a way of caring for your body and well-being? Or do you see it as work with temporary benefits? The better your opinion toward physical activity, the more you will look forward to it. Exercise should not unnecessarily feel like work. It should feel like investing in your health, which makes any effort required more than worth it.

4. How do you eat? Do you eat quickly, or do you take your time? Do you eat your carbohydrates first, or do you focus on proteins? What do you drink with your meals? These questions shed light to how you eat, which could have harmed you in ways you are not aware.

You should eat slowly. Save your carbohydrates for last because in all likelihood they are already abundant in your diet. And needless to say, water is better than soda. But do not hesitate to make your juices.

5. What is your motivation to change? Lastly, ask yourself about your motivation. While not directly a measure of your lifestyle, it impacts your behavior in more ways than you know. If your motivation to change is fueled by a drive to avoid complications brought on by chronic diseases, you are more likely to succeed than if you would simply like to lose a few pounds. A Type 2 diabetes diagnosis can often be a wake-up call to action. But motivation can also be short -lived.

If you are to succeed with your goals ensure your motivation is not temporary. Remind yourself of the benefits of a healthy lifestyle, and what you have to gain by making changes.